The Iron Giant review: Retro Review

The Iron Giant posterGiant alien-robots, laser beams, sci-fi, oh my! The Iron Giant has everything to capture the imaginations of young space fanatic viewers. But the movie also touches on darker themes older viewers will catch and appreciate. Themes of war time tension, nuclear weapons and death are sprinkled throughout the movie. These darker commentries  separates The Iron Giant to more than just an animated feature for the kiddies.

The Iron Giant is directed by Brad Bird, the writer behind Ratatouille (2007) and Up (2009) and was released in 1999. Most recently, Brad Bird is known for his work on the animated Incredibles 2. The movie features the voices of Eli Marienthal as the young Hogarth Hughes, Jennifer Aniston voicing Annie Hughes and Vin Diesel as the titular Iron Giant. Continue reading

Scrooged review “More than just a mediocre Christmas film”

Scrooged PosterChristmas films have a notoriety for being sickeningly happy. Everything is sugar and spice and everything nice from the off, sprinkling the holiday season with unattainable aims and memories that are ridiculously lacking in arguments.

Charles Dickens took Christmas and made a story that stood the test of time: one that started off dark, brooding and full of greed and ended on a, moderately sweet, high note. In 1988, a reworking of this tale, ‘A Christmas Carol‘, was released, starring Bill Murray and a whole lot of jokes. Continue reading

Die Hard review “Is it a Christmas movie?”

Die Hard PosterIt’s almost December: the yuletide season is upon us and many people are settling down to watch their favourite Christmas films. At this point in the year, it becomes acceptable to watch the best action film, and possibly the most controversial Christmas film of all time: Die Hard.

The film is set on Christmas Eve, as a forlorn looking John McClane (Bruce Willis) arrives in LA for Christmas with his family. His wife, Holly (Bonnie Bedelia), worls for the Nakatomi Corporation in the, aptly named, Nakatomi Plaza. During the office Christmas party, a group of bank robbers led by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) break in and hold the building hostage. It is then up to McClane, who is in a separate office to the party, to save the day. Continue reading

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure review “A retrospective look”

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure posterThe definition of a masterpiece can be hard to pin down. In many ways, a masterpiece is the best that something can be: the pinnacle of its creation. This is how I see Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure.

Don’t get me wrong, a 1980’s comedy about two idiots (Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter) who travel through space and time in a phone box to collect important people from history for a school project, is definitely far fetched. It’s also original, funny and genuinely (debatably) good. Continue reading

The Princess Bride review “A 30th birthday celebration”

The Princess Bride theatrical posterNot many films say 1980s fantasy like The Princess Bride. From the score, to the acting, to the opening scene being a child playing HardBall! – it doesn’t get much more 80s. It came out in 1987: 30 years later, has it stood the test of time?

It follows a child (Fred Savage) being read a book by his Grandpa about the adventures of a girl called Buttercup (Robin Wright): the most beautiful girl in the world. After agreeing to marry Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon), she is kidnapped, only to be saved by the Man In Black (Carey Elwes). What follows is basically a competition to see whether the Prince or the Man in Black can marry Buttercup without dying first. Continue reading