Die Hard review “Is it a Christmas movie?”

Die Hard PosterIt’s almost December: the yuletide season is upon us and many people are settling down to watch their favourite Christmas films. At this point in the year, it becomes acceptable to watch the best action film, and possibly the most controversial Christmas film of all time: Die Hard.

The film is set on Christmas Eve, as a forlorn looking John McClane (Bruce Willis) arrives in LA for Christmas with his family. His wife, Holly (Bonnie Bedelia), worls for the Nakatomi Corporation in the, aptly named, Nakatomi Plaza. During the office Christmas party, a group of bank robbers led by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) break in and hold the building hostage. It is then up to McClane, who is in a separate office to the party, to save the day. Continue reading

Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure review “A retrospective look”

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure posterThe definition of a masterpiece can be hard to pin down. In many ways, a masterpiece is the best that something can be: the pinnacle of its creation. This is how I see Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure.

Don’t get me wrong, a 1980’s comedy about two idiots (Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter) who travel through space and time in a phone box to collect important people from history for a school project, is definitely far fetched. It’s also original, funny and genuinely (debatably) good. Continue reading

The Princess Bride review “A 30th birthday celebration”

The Princess Bride theatrical posterNot many films say 1980s fantasy like The Princess Bride. From the score, to the acting, to the opening scene being a child playing HardBall! – it doesn’t get much more 80s. It came out in 1987: 30 years later, has it stood the test of time?

It follows a child (Fred Savage) being read a book by his Grandpa about the adventures of a girl called Buttercup (Robin Wright): the most beautiful girl in the world. After agreeing to marry Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon), she is kidnapped, only to be saved by the Man In Black (Carey Elwes). What follows is basically a competition to see whether the Prince or the Man in Black can marry Buttercup without dying first. Continue reading

The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert review “Life’s a Drag”

Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Spanish posterPossibly the gaudiest film to come out of 1994, The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert is a far cry from the action blockbusters the 90s are famed for. It follows two drag queens (Hugo Weaving and Guy Pearce) and a transgender woman (Terence Stamp) on their adventure across Australia in a “lavender” bus, aptly named ‘Priscilla, Queen of the Desert’.

Weaving, Pearce and Stamp are the dream team. Their energy bounces off each other like kangaroos in the outback, making their friendship the standout in this movie. The dirty, gutter-scraped humour ricochets around the scenes, bringing a smile to the most sullen of faces. Their chemistry, and the stellar writing and directing by Stephan Elliot, ties the whole film together, making it flow like a dream. Continue reading

MM Retro Review: Chocolate

14886217_1040838869357950_851251975_nBy Rob Stoakes. So there aren’t any films out as of time of writing. No superhero movies, no sequels, no big launches for multi-film franchises, and you know what that means. Yes, it’s time to make up a flimsy excuse to talk about a film that’s more than a few weeks old. This is an action film, and there are action films out right now…

… sure, that will do.

It’s more than probable that you’ve not even heard of today’s retro review subject, Chocolate. It’s main claim to fame is that it was directed by the same guy who directed Ong Bak, and that’s the level of obscurity we’re talking about. This is a crime, however, because Chocolate has the distinction of possibly the most tasteful portrayal of autism in movies… and also the least tasteful. Continue reading