The Platform review “It may make you think of a COVID-19 world, but we’re not all that bad”

 

The Platform movie poster

Like something from American Psycho (Mary Harron, 2000) and the film’s clever opening credits in which we see raspberry coulis dripping on a white dinner plate, looking a lot like blood. The Platform in a similar sense shows decadent cuisine that represents class structures and the violence that will prevail around these tiers. In its opening, e witness a high-class banquet preparation which is then contrasted by the people below, the ones who are imprisoned in a hole.

The hole is a strange high tech concept that is like solitary confinement but with changing inmates. We meet the main newcomer Goreng (Ivan Massagué) and an older grisly man, Trimagasi (Zorion Eguileor) who has nearly completed his journey and is no stranger to this setup. However, this is not a prison system as such, and we learn that Goreng has chosen to be here. As it is explained by the company’s Imoguiri, the familiar Spanish actor Antonia San Juan (All About My Mother), it is a “Vertical Self- Management Center”. Continue reading

Klaus review “Christmas came early”

Klaus movie posterAh, Christmas. A time of joy, of family, of eating way too much food. Christmas movies are one of life’s simple pleasures, and even though you only get to watch them once a year, there’s a definite space in everyone’s heart for their favourite one. Netflix has well and truly jumped on the Christmas bandwagon, releasing their first movie in mid November. Named Klaus, it’s a testament to the origin of that infamous character we all know and love: Santa Claus.

Although it does ignore the religious aspects of Christmas, Klaus takes a darker turn. When a spoiled, rich postman arrives on the tiny island of Smeerensburg after a challenge set by his father, the luxuries he has become accustomed to are no longer within his reach. The island is split in two – two warring families rule the land, and it’s people are equally as hostile and violent. However, when he ventures north of the main town, he finds a cabin full of toys, and a strange man with a long white beard. Continue reading

The Irishman review “Scorsese treads no new ground”

The Irishman poster

Scorsese is back! But wait, it gets better… Following a 13-year hiatus from the gangster genre, he returns to the fold with a 3.5 hour-long epic starring all your favourite wise guys from the 80s and 90s. The Irishman, also titled I Heard You Paint Houses in the opening credits (there must have been some sort of mix-up in the marketing department), sees Robert De Niro return to Scorsese’s roll call as real-life gangster Frank Sheeran, a lorry driver turned crook made infamous by his association with the Bufalino crime family.

I must admit, after seeing the cast, the trailer and the reviews that followed, I was very excited as I sat down to watch The Irishman. Not only do we get a Scorsese gangster film, but we get a Scorsese gangster film with Harvey Keitel, we get Joe Pesci back from retirement and, to top it all off, we get De Niro and Pacino, two of Hollywood’s greatest actors, sharing screen time for only the third time in cinema history. Continue reading

Someone Great review “A very important movie”

Someone Great movie posterAs lovely as some of the older romantic comedies may be, a lot of them are a bit out of date nowadays. From the lack of feminist perspectives, to the multitude of damsels in distress, it’s refreshing when a movie strays from the status quo. One of Netflix’s newer releases, Someone Great, takes the appeal of a rom-com, but adds a 21st-century twist.

Someone Great follows Jenny, as she navigates the collapse of her nine-year long relationship on her last night in New York. Her two friends, Blair and Erin, help her enjoy her newly single self, whilst also making everlasting memories with each other on their very last evening together. Continue reading

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile review “Making serial killers sexy again…”

Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile movie posterDon’t you just love a sexy serial killer? Hollywood certainly does. Recent onscreen depictions have been accused of romanticising men who have committed atrocious crimes because the actors chosen to play them are significantly more attractive. For example, Ross Lynch, the teen heartthrob star of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, played serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer back in 2018; a man who brutally raped and murdered 17 men and boys from 1978 to 1991.

In the same year, former Glee star Darren Criss was cast as Andrew Cunanan, the spree killer who murdered five people during a three month period in 1997.  Now it’s the turn of serial killer and rapist Ted Bundy to receive an aesthetic upgrade in Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile, directed by Joe Berlinger. Continue reading