Soul review “Pixar’s most mature film yet”

Soul movie poster

I remember when Pixar was acquired by Disney in 2006, and fans of the animation studio’s work up until that point were absolutely appalled. Concerned, and rightly so, that the House of Mouse would destroy that “small-time studio” feel that Pixar had, it was deemed as a billion dollar catastrophe.

Despite all those reservations, it’s now clear, 14 years on, that Disney’s acquisition of the studio was a positive move for both. Pixar had the ability to create films on a much larger (aka more expensive) scale, and Disney had another studio name to add to its profitability as they began their global domination-style plan. mwahahahaha!

That’s the history lesson over with. Now, as we approach the end of 2020, and with the world completely turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic, Pixar’s latest film, Soul, released directly to Disney+ is just the film we needed to turn our frowns upside down. But how good is it?

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The Pink Panther (1963) review “A totally average start to a funny franchise”

The Pink Panther poster

Color is something we often talk about with movies. Movies like The Grand Budapest Hotel and Blade Runner 2049 are movies frequently discussed for their beautiful color palettes, but before we were talking about colorful movies, we talked about their colorful titles. Many of my favorite movies have colors in the title. Soylent Green’s political intrigue, R.E.D’s hilarious moments and witty dialogue, or the combination of all of those things in Primary Colors, which is a great movie which has not been thought of at all during this very fun campaign year in America.

However, if you ever asked someone to name a movie with a color in the title, they’d say The Pink Panther. A classic comedy which gave us a franchise that lasted almost fifty years before Steve Martin brutally murdered it with two very unfunny films. So how good was the starting point in order to form an eleven film franchise?

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A Monster Calls review “A visual and storytelling masterpiece”

J.A. Bayona is one of the most exciting directors working today, a bold statement that maybe, but in this review, I’ll tell you why. His knack for creating superbly shot, engaging films like The Orphanage and The Impossible has meant many in Hollywood have been keeping an intrigued eye on him.

His hard work paid off in 2018 when it was announced he would be taking over directorial duties on the Jurassic World sequel, Fallen Kingdom, and despite a less than stellar critical response, no-one could argue that it was the most beautiful film in the Jurassic saga. Before he took on that behemoth of a movie however, Bayona was busy working on A Monster Calls, based on the book of the same name by Patrick Ness. But how does it stack up when compared with the rest of the director’s resume?

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The films that influenced me: Jack Horsley

Jack Horsley influential films

In the final chapter of the most influential films of Movie Metropolis contributors, our newest writer, Jack Horsley, takes a personal journey through film, picking out the 10 movies that have meant the most to him. You can find the links to Adam, Joe, Daulton, Jesse and Louise’s articles at the bottom of this article.

In this article I will explore the films that influenced me. Those that gave me a passion for film and helped me look at film the way I do today.

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The Mortuary Collection review “Decidedly short on scares, surprisingly full of laughs”

The Mortuary Collection poster

Has anyone even heard of Shudder? Until a few weeks ago, I hadn’t. The Horror focussed streaming service launched in 2015 and, until now, has enjoyed a rather low profile. Amongst a sea of streaming competitors, the decision to pitch themselves as a one genre pony appears, on the surface, to be a bit of a tactical misfire, but there’s just something about horror that sets it apart from other genres isn’t there?

Where other genres are watched by almost anyone and everyone, horror seems to have its own unique fanbase. I, myself, sit in the intersection of that particular Venn diagram; I consider myself both a general film fan as well as a horror fanatic. So, I guess you could say, I’m the perfect target audience for Shudder.

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