The After Party review “A coming-of-age movie for the present day”

The After Party movie posterWith September rolling closer by the second and the new school year approaching, this year is passing by like lightning. Thousands of youths will be making decisions that will affect the rest of their lives, and following dreams that they have had for years. It seems only fitting, then, to watch the new coming-of-age movie by Netflix, titled The After Party.

The After Party follows two best friends – Jeff and Owen – as they try to desperately sign a record deal the night before Owen is signed up for the Marines. With strippers, Rolls Royce Phantoms and a handful of chart topping rappers, this movie appears to have it all. Continue reading

Anime review: Perfect Blue

Perfect Blue movie posterIn the late 70s, the heady buzz surrounding anime that had been ushered into the West by titles such as the 1963 TV series Astro Boy and the 1965 Kimba the White Lion had started to fade. Video store shelves had begun to bulge with violent, gun-toting Lolita’s and cult followings of the hyper-sexual tentacle porn (hentai) had soured the reputation of the genre.

Then came Akira (1988) and with it a swath of landmark films that would guide the genre into a Western renaissance. The release of Perfect Blue by director Satoshi Kon in 1997 showcased a brash, gaudy, visually haunting feature that, in true Kon style, provided us with an uncomfortably accurate prophesier to the erosion of private life in the internet age. Continue reading

Her review “For the Love”

Her movie posterToday it is almost impossible to go about without technology readily by our side. From smart phones to laptops and watches that now do more than just tell time, we are tied to technology one way or another. We have established relationships of entertainment, work and even a relationship of dependency with these technologies. In Spike Jonze’s Her (2013) this relationship with technology is explored in terms of actual affection and love.

Director Spike Jonze previously directed the children’s  book adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are in 2009. Her stars Joaquin Phoenix as the lonely Theodore and the voice of Scarlett Johansson as Samantha, the operating system Theodore falls in love with. Additional actors that lend their voices include Bill Hader, Kristen Wiig and Spike Jonze himself as the foul mouthed alien boy. Continue reading

The Darkest Minds review “An exercise in poor world building”

The Darkest Minds posterWas I the only one who thought we were done with YA movies? Especially with Maze Runner: The Death Cure being released earlier this year, along with the final Divergent movie being cancelled, I thought the whole “movies based on books with an evil adult government stopping the young people in a futuristic setting” genre was over with.

However, I was wrong with The Darkest Minds hitting theatres in the U.S a few weeks ago. I was one of the few people to see it opening day and after seeing it, I can see why this has one of the worst openings at over 3,000 theatres of all time. I can’t sum up how bad this movie is in just a sentence, so I suppose I should jump into why this is one of the worst movies of the year so far. Continue reading

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before review “An ode to John Hughes”

To All the Boys I've Loved Before posterNetflix have produced their fair share of teenage rom-coms. From The Kissing Booth to Alex Strangelove, it’s undeniable that their range is diverse, but lacking imagination. So, when Netflix’s latest release, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, popped up under recently added, I didn’t expect a lot from it. I can safely say, I was pleasantly surprised.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before follows Lara-Jean (Lana Condor), a teenage girl who has never been in a relationship before. She is invisible at high school and, when her older sister Margot (Janel Parrish) moves away to attend university, she is left friendless too. However, over the years, Lara-Jean has written a love letter to every boy she has ever had a crush on and has kept them in a box, hidden away. Then, somehow: they are sent to all of the boys she has ever been in love with. Continue reading