Can You Ever Forgive Me? review “McCarthy at her best”

Can You Ever Forgive Me posterI confess that when I heard a small indie film about the life of author Lee Israel was to star Melissa McCarthy I was confused. McCarthy is not generally associated with drama. Her wheelhouse is comedy. Melissa McCarthy led comedies tend to range from the very good Spy to the adyssmal Happy Time Murders but more often than not they are like the forgettable Life of the Party.

I had McCarthy pigeonholed. Her identity and range as a performer were limited to comedy in my mind. I dismissed her, skipped her movies when they were in theatres, thought of her as less than she really was. I know I am alone in this misconception, I have a plethora of dismissive internet articles that say exactly that but with a much higher word count. Continue reading

Mudbound review “Heartbreaking, but poignant”

Mudbound posterRed carpets are being rolled out, golden trophies are being polished and envelopes are being organised. The Oscars are nearing, and what better way to celebrate than watching the first ever Netflix film to be Oscar-nominated?

Before we begin, the Movie Metropolis Alternative Oscars close this Friday (March 2nd) before the big reveal on Sunday (March 4th). Make sure you cast your vote for the best films and performances of last year. It takes less than 2 minutes.

The film in question is Mudbound, directed by Dee Rees. The movie follows the McAllan’s and the Jackson’s: families in deep farmland Mississipi. Set during and after the war, the film deals with many issues, particularly the treatment of African-Americans in 1940s America. Continue reading

Lady Bird review “Unapologetically human”

Lady Bird theatrical posterThe teen drama can be a tempestuous beast. When showing a character as coming-of-age, they run the risk of coming across too contrived, too dramatic, and lacking the realism that everyone experienced when they came of age. Lady Bird, the directing debut of actress Greta Gerwig, is one of those teen dramas, however, that lives up to the hype.

The story follows Lady Bird (Saorsie Ronan), a 17-year-old girl in Sacramento, as she navigates her last year of high school in 2002.

I know what you may be thinking: surely this is another one of those cliched, stereotypical teen films with over the top portrayals of teenage girls written by someone who most definitely never was a teenage girl? You couldn’t be more wrong. Continue reading