6 Balloons review “Raw, tense and real”

6 Balloons movie posterDave Franco and Abbi Jacobson are two actors who aren’t typically associated with serious dramas. After Franco’s stint in the Bad Neighbours films and Abbi’s amazing work on Broad City, comedy is generally where these actors fortes will lie. However, 6 Balloons is a welcome foray for these two into the world of drama, showing the versatility of these two already talented actors.

6 Balloons follows Katie (Jacobson) as she navigates how to cope with her brother Seth’s (Franco) addiction to heroin whilst on a brutal drive to a detox centre as well as juggling her own life. Continue reading

When We First Met review “A lost cause”

When We First Met posterThe romantic comedy. No other movie genre has come so far, seen so much and produced so little in terms of good films. The latest Netflix release, When We First Met, is no exception to this.

The film follows Noah (Adam Devine) who is in love with Avery (Alexandra Daddario). However, shockingly, Avery doesn’t love Noah, but Noah loves Avery. Many rom-com cliches later, Noah ends up in a photo booth that can travel in time. He utilises this discovery in order to make Avery fall in love with him, instead of her amazingly perfect boyfriend Ethan (Robbie Amell). Continue reading

Super Dark Times review “A film that disturbs you into watching”

Super Dark Times posterIndie horrors are often classed as some of the best ones out there. It Follows, The Blair Witch Project and Saw are all examples of the indie horror genre creating something, a story so disturbing and chilling, that it lingers. Netflix has done that with Super Dark Times.

Super Dark Times follows best friends Zach and Josh as they navigate teenage life in the 1990s. However, a gruesome accident leads to a secret they need to keep, which eventually drives a wedge between them, propelling them down a rabbit hole of escalating paranoia and violence. Continue reading

The Babysitter review “How not to be a babysitter”

The Babysitter posterWho doesn’t like a comedy horror movie? They combine the best of both worlds: the sadistic, gore-loving, blood-drenched genre of horror, and cheesy, light-hearted, laughs. However, it is a fine art to master. Netflix’s latest stab at the pastiche, The Babysitter, is definitely a good attempt. Is it, however, art?

The answer, in short, is no. It’s not art, but it’s thoroughly entertaining throughout its 85-minute running time. As far as horror-comedies go, it isn’t the worst.

The film follows Cole (Judah Lewis) as he spies on his babysitter after his bedtime, only to find out that she is the head of a satanic cult. What follows are a series of deaths and attempted deaths, all varying in extremeness and graphic content. Continue reading