Scoob! review “ruh roh”

Scoob! movie poster

Putting on a Scooby Doo movie is the truest form of gambling. You can end up with a great time with something like Scooby-Doo: Pirates Ahoy and Scooby-Doo: Stage Fright, or you could see Scooby-Doo and WWE: Curse of the Speed Demon and Scooby Doo and KISS: Rock and Roll Mystery (The crossovers aren’t great). As I am the world’s foremost expert on the subject of Mystery Incorporated and their many endeavors, I approached the newest theatrical, well, almost theatrical, film, Scoob, with cautious optimism.

The first trailer made it look like it’d be a fun, enjoyable time. Then came the second trailer, followed by the countless ads on Vudu, which made my excitement tailspin. Then I bought, yes, bought the movie so I could watch it forever and ever. To put it mildly, this is the film equivalent of Scrappy Doo, because it’s the worst Scooby related material. I can’t put the pain of reliving the movie any longer, “pets” talk about Scoob.

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The Willoughbys review “A childhood fever dream”

The Willoughby's poster

Animated kids films have, over the years, gone from strength to strength. With franchises like Toy Story and Frozen, and indie animations like 2019’s Klaus, it’s clear to see that children are hardly deprived of top-notch filmmaking. Netflix’s latest foray into the cartoon business is The Willoughbys: an energetic, colourful, and plain weird take on family life, based on the book by Lois Lowry.

The Willoughbys follows the Willoughby family: a red haired, spectacularly moustachioed cohort that are known, throughout history, for doing creative and courageous things. However, Mother and Father Willoughby are more interested in each other than their four children, leaving them to live with no food, no fun, and no love. After a child is left on their doorstep one night, the Willoughby children hatch a plan to become orphans themselves – but it doesn’t quite go how they were planning.

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Bloodshot review “The least of anyone’s problems at the moment”

Bloodshot movie posterBloodshot is available to stream online in the UK (from £9.99) and the US ($20) via Amazon Prime Video

Oh, Vin Diesel. Why are you famous? Also known as the Americanized Jason Statham, replacing charisma with mumbling something-something family. This feels like a movie Statham would have been asked to do about fifteen years ago. Bloodshot, the story of a recently deceased soldier who comes back to life, is one of the three movies which won the honor of being in the last week of releases until mid May.

So, in a year still without a really good comic book film, does Bloodshot manage to fill the gap before we’re left without one for months? Honestly, the answer is pretty surprising, as I think with a few changes, this movie could have been great. So let’s discuss the movie that tens of people are talking about, Bloodshot.  Continue reading

Netflix films perfect for Lockdown: Top 5

Netflix films for lockdownAs we are all well and truly in lockdown mode both in the UK and across the majority of the globe right now we don’t need to feel guilty about missing that party or turning up late to the pub for Friday night drinks, and can simply, Netflix and chill.

Here is a list I have put together of some compelling films currently available to watch on the streaming service, Netflix. There isn’t a particular theme here, but I have tried to cover all bases with the choices I have made. That being said you could say this list goes from darkest to lightest. Continue reading

Retro Review – Reservoir Dogs: Tarantino at his raw, unrefined best

Reservoir Dogs posterAfter last year’s bitterly disappointing Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, which presumably only received an Oscar nomination because of its subject matter, I decided it was time to revisit some of Tarantino’s classics. I’ve always been a huge fan of his work, but Once Upon A Time in Hollywood was such a drab, underwhelming, damp squib of a movie, I actually started to question my Tarantino loyalty.

Reservoir Dogs is a film that I have always hugely enjoyed though and, having not seen it for a good few years, what better place to start? The film was initially released in 1992 and the story behind production is a quite an interesting one. Made on a meagre budget ($1.2 million), Tarantino had to beg, borrow and steal to get his debut film made. Continue reading