Justice League Dark: Apokolips War review “Avengers: Meh-ndgame”

Justice League Dark: Apokolips War posterBefore I was the movie aficionado we all know and begrudgingly tolerate, I was a different kind of aficionado, one of DC comic books. Due to this, I find the DC Animated Universe very interesting, as they can tell the stories that I loved to read years ago like Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay and give the story it’s due, while the DCEU films about those same stories like Suicide Squad fall flat on its face, onto a set of stairs, tumbling down them and breaking every single bone. The DCAU has virtually led to this.

Aside from a few very interesting diversions into the multiverse such as Superman: Red Son or Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, the story of the DCAU has all been building to Darkseid destroying Earth with films like Reign of the Supermen and Justice League: War all coming to a head here. Last year showed us that it is possible for major superhero franchises that have been going on for years to end a storyline really well with Avengers: Endgame. In fact, Endgame did such a good job at this, that Apokolips War lifts a large amount of it’s story from Endgame. Continue reading

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga review “Eurovision, but with Will Ferrell”

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga poster

Once a year, on a Saturday evening in May, arguably the most exciting television event in the world is broadcast internationally: the Eurovision Song Contest. Known for being over the top, crazy, and sometimes, hilarious, Eurovision has graced our screens for over 60 years. So, when it was announced that comedy veteran Will Ferrell was bringing us a Eurovision movie, it’s obvious that many people began to wait with bated breath for it to be released. Alas, that time has arrived, and Netflix dropped Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga for the world to enjoy, and to laugh at.

The film follows Fire Saga, an Icelandic duo comprised of Lars (Will Ferrell) and Sigrit (Rachel McAdams) as they attempt to reach the Eurovision finals in Edinburgh. However, it doesn’t really help that they’re not very good. As the duo, who may be siblings but probably aren’t, embark on a musical and romantic journey, they meet a lot of new people, and a lot of new problems, on their way.

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Retro Review – Goldfinger: The blueprint for spy films

Goldfinger posterNo Time to Die was originally supposed to be released at the end of April. I had my tickets and everything. During my time in Quarantine, I’ve tried to satisfy my Bond craving in many ways. Watching the 1967 Casino Royale, which was actually the only Bond film that I hadn’t seen, listening to the Bond soundtrack while getting groceries, and writing my own script for a Bond film called More Time to Kill, but after the death of Honor Blackman last month, I rewatched 1964’s Goldfinger.

I have a ton of memories involving Goldfinger, for the most part involving the levels in the videogame 007 Legends, but it was always one of the few Connery’s that actually grabbed me. I also want to preface this review with the fact that I don’t want to use the word iconic too many times in this review, so I replaced every time I say “Iconic” with a song from Abba. So, to prevent us from killing more time, let’s start on Goldfinger. Continue reading

The Platform review “It may make you think of a COVID-19 world, but we’re not all that bad”

 

The Platform movie poster

Like something from American Psycho (Mary Harron, 2000) and the film’s clever opening credits in which we see raspberry coulis dripping on a white dinner plate, looking a lot like blood. The Platform in a similar sense shows decadent cuisine that represents class structures and the violence that will prevail around these tiers. In its opening, e witness a high-class banquet preparation which is then contrasted by the people below, the ones who are imprisoned in a hole.

The hole is a strange high tech concept that is like solitary confinement but with changing inmates. We meet the main newcomer Goreng (Ivan Massagué) and an older grisly man, Trimagasi (Zorion Eguileor) who has nearly completed his journey and is no stranger to this setup. However, this is not a prison system as such, and we learn that Goreng has chosen to be here. As it is explained by the company’s Imoguiri, the familiar Spanish actor Antonia San Juan (All About My Mother), it is a “Vertical Self- Management Center”. Continue reading

Faulty Roots review “A sweet but important debut”

Faulty Roots posterIt is humbling going into a film knowing that there will be some kind of social message. As a horror enthusiast, I have always enjoyed this aspect of film. It only makes sense that taboo or harder to tackle subjects could easily be infused into the genre allowing for creativity or confrontational situations.

In this case, Faulty Roots, a short film written, directed and produced by 18-year-old Ella Greenwood has a message. Greenwood plays the main character of Lola who suffers from depression. She meets up with friend Zack (Sani Thabo) who has an incurable genetic illness and they form a bond. Continue reading