Tomb Raider review “Contains little tomb raiding”

Tomb Raider movie posterAcademy Award-winner Alicia Vikander is probably not the first choice for many to portray legendary video game character, Lara Croft. Perhaps Jennifer Lawrence, Natalie Portman or even Keira Knightley would have been above Vikander to be in with a shot of bagging the role?

That’s all conjecture anyway as Vikander is the leading lady we have ended up with, for better or for worse. But is this Tomb Raider reboot the film to end that dreaded video game to movie curse and can Vikander take on the role that Angelina Jolie made so famous back in the early 00s? Read on to find out. Continue reading

Mute review “Unnecessarily quiet”

Mute movie posterIt is likely that many people would assume a film with a lead character that cannot speak, wouldn’t do very well. 2018, however, has proved this wrong, with The Shape of Water winning four Oscars at the Academy Awards this year. Netflix has jumped on the bandwagon of unconventional leads, releasing Mute, directed by Duncan Jones.

Mute follows a mute, Amish barman called Leo, as he looks for his blue-haired girlfriend Naadirah in the gangster-ridden city of Berlin. With a stellar cast, amazing CGI and the director of Moon at the helm, it would be surprising if this movie was anything less than great. Continue reading

Lady Bird review “Unapologetically human”

Lady Bird theatrical posterThe teen drama can be a tempestuous beast. When showing a character as coming-of-age, they run the risk of coming across too contrived, too dramatic, and lacking the realism that everyone experienced when they came of age. Lady Bird, the directing debut of actress Greta Gerwig, is one of those teen dramas, however, that lives up to the hype.

The story follows Lady Bird (Saorsie Ronan), a 17-year-old girl in Sacramento, as she navigates her last year of high school in 2002.

I know what you may be thinking: surely this is another one of those cliched, stereotypical teen films with over the top portrayals of teenage girls written by someone who most definitely never was a teenage girl? You couldn’t be more wrong. Continue reading

Phantom Thread review “Anderson is on top form”

Phantom Thread posterPaul Thomas Anderson has built a career on his endless fascination with dysfunctional anthropoid relationships and characters with a masochistic tendency for extreme self-examination or flagellation.

Just a brief glance at his filmography is evidence for this: Philip Seymour Hoffman’s awkward, sexually repressed boom operator Scotty in Boogie Nights, the messed up multi-faceted bunch of unravelling familial ties in Magnolia, the Scientology-esque oppressive cult of The Master and Punch-Drunk-Love’s tortuous fairytale romance. And now he’s back again, hopping across the pond for this tailor-made gothic romance set in the late 1950s, post-war London. Continue reading

The Greatest Showman review “All the fun of the circus”

The Greatest Showman posterAh, the movie musical. Once the choice of matinee viewings and Saturday nights in front of the TV, they’ve evolved over the last decade into something completely mainstream. From the ridiculously good remake of Hairspray in 2007, to the vibrant Mamma Mia, which gets its very own sequel Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again this year, musicals have become the ultimate in escapism.

Following on from his exceptional role in the deeply depressing Les Miserables, everyone’s favourite Australian actor, Hugh Jackman returns to the genre with The Greatest Showman. But is it worth you warming up your vocal chords for? Continue reading