MM Top 5: How to rescue Superman

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By Rob Stoakes

So, Batman vs Superman was amazing/great/ok/bad/worse than a wrestling match between X-Pac and Piers Morgan, delete where applicable. As of writing it isn’t out yet, but already people are nervous about the future of Superman. After all, how badly did Man of Steel get received when you need to bring in Batman for help?

I know exactly how to cure Warner Bros’ curse of being unable to make a good film with any superhero other than Batman, in five easy steps! Continue reading

“The most Guy Ritchie-est film ever” The Man From U.N.C.L.E review

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.  (UK CERT: 12A)

Director: Guy Ritchie  

Music: Daniel Pemberton

Starring: Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, Alicia Vikander


REVIEW AUTHOR: Rob Stoakes

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Themes and analogy have never been that far away from blockbuster films, even if you don’t think that they have, and this year has been a prime indicator for that. Kingsman was on the surface a Bond parody and homage, but had strong themes of class warfare. It Follows seems to follow the old horror tradition of monsters murdering sexually active teenagers, but the monster can also be seen to represent STIs, maturity and death. The film doesn’t even need to be particularly complex; Mad Max: Fury Road is essentially a feminist outline of the dangers of worshiping hyper-masculinity and one of the most unflinching looks at people as property in recent cinema history.

So what’s on Guy Ritchie’s mind? If The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is any indicator, it would be opposites. When you notice the theme, it suddenly becomes inescapable. There’s obvious stuff, like how the capitalist U.S.A and communist U.S.S.R are working together and how everyone in the film seems to not be at all bothered about the threat of a nuclear holocaust, but it goes deeper than that. Continue reading