You Were Never Really Here review “Unforgivingly artful”

You Were Never Really Here posterArt house cinema. The mere mention of this genre will spark endless discussions from its profound role in film to its disassociation in the collective consciousness of movie goers. But what is art house? For me what makes a movie “art house” is its unwavering devotion to its particular vision. This is why many art house films of today strive in the indie scene, as they are not bound by huge studio return on investments.

Enter indie director Lynne Ramsay’s retelling of the novella of the same name, You Were Never Really Here. In classic art house fashion, the reception to You Were Never Really Here has divided many viewers. My goal here is to contextualize the movie in hopes of getting someone off that perpetual fence. Continue reading

The Sisters Brothers review “A slow burn that never lights”

The Sisters Brothers movie posterJoaquin Phoenix, John C. Reilly, Riz Ahmed, and Jake Gyllenhaal all in a comedy-western, directed by Jacques Audiard which was given fantastic reviews and an amazing trailer sounds like it should combine to make one of the best movies of 2018, right?

I saw this on the film’s opening day in a surprisingly empty theatre and was extremely excited as it had been delayed by weeks. I patiently watched as the trailers and opening credits rolled by, with an entire screen filled with all the production companies moved past to the opening scene. Now, I haven’t seen many westerns, but the ones I have I really enjoy. Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight are fantastic films, both of which I own on Blu-Ray. However, with The Sisters Brothers, I was severely disappointed, and let me discuss why. Continue reading

Her review “For the Love”

Her movie posterToday it is almost impossible to go about without technology readily by our side. From smart phones to laptops and watches that now do more than just tell time, we are tied to technology one way or another. We have established relationships of entertainment, work and even a relationship of dependency with these technologies. In Spike Jonze’s Her (2013) this relationship with technology is explored in terms of actual affection and love.

Director Spike Jonze previously directed the children’s  book adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are in 2009. Her stars Joaquin Phoenix as the lonely Theodore and the voice of Scarlett Johansson as Samantha, the operating system Theodore falls in love with. Additional actors that lend their voices include Bill Hader, Kristen Wiig and Spike Jonze himself as the foul mouthed alien boy. Continue reading