The Best of James Bond: Top 5

Considering we’re still none the wiser about the true release date of Bond #25, No Time To Die, there’s surely no better moment to do an all time, best-of-Bond top 5. Granted, there may be 24 films in the series to date, but once you dispense of the spoofy Roger Moore years, the Daniel Craig misfires and the ones where Sean Connery had clearly given up caring, there really is only a dozen or so to choose from.

As a minor disclaimer, before creating this list, I didn’t go back and re-watch every film in the franchise – a single viewing of Moonraker is more than sufficient for one lifetime. With that being said, let’s jump into the definitive list of the top 5 films starring everyone’s favourite sociopathic secret service agent.

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Retro Review – Goldfinger: The blueprint for spy films

Goldfinger posterNo Time to Die was originally supposed to be released at the end of April. I had my tickets and everything. During my time in Quarantine, I’ve tried to satisfy my Bond craving in many ways. Watching the 1967 Casino Royale, which was actually the only Bond film that I hadn’t seen, listening to the Bond soundtrack while getting groceries, and writing my own script for a Bond film called More Time to Kill, but after the death of Honor Blackman last month, I rewatched 1964’s Goldfinger.

I have a ton of memories involving Goldfinger, for the most part involving the levels in the videogame 007 Legends, but it was always one of the few Connery’s that actually grabbed me. I also want to preface this review with the fact that I don’t want to use the word iconic too many times in this review, so I replaced every time I say “Iconic” with a song from Abba. So, to prevent us from killing more time, let’s start on Goldfinger. Continue reading

MM Top 5: Movie Metropolis articles (birthday special)

10933939_858255040882983_331142605952023910_nBy Adam Brannon

Movie Metropolis was born from my love of writing and my passion for the art of film-making. Six years ago today (October 19th) the site was set up by myself in an effort to channel my reviewing tendencies into something a little more concrete.

Over half a decade later, the website has grown at an astonishing rate, attracting thousands of visitors from across the globe and connecting them through their love of cinema.

In 2016, Movie Metropolis launched MM Play, a dedicated YouTube channel aimed at providing fun and engaging multi-platform content, moving away from the usual reviews that have formed the backbone of the the site’s online presence.

Here, as a birthday special, I look through the five articles that have been viewed more times than any other posts on the site. Continue reading

“Wearing its dunce hat proud” Spectre review

SPECTRE (UK Cert 15)

Director: Sam Mendes

Music: Thomas Newman

Starring: Daniel Craig, Christoph Waltz, Léa Seydoux, Ralph Fiennes


Written by Rob Stoakes

Written by Rob Stoakes

Dear reader, what makes you love a film?

What is it about certain films on your DVD shelf that hooked you? When you search for torrents, what is it that you’re looking for? What is it on movie posters that makes you scour the floor nearby to see if anyone’s accidentally dropped their cinema ticket? Continue reading

“The most Guy Ritchie-est film ever” The Man From U.N.C.L.E review

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.  (UK CERT: 12A)

Director: Guy Ritchie  

Music: Daniel Pemberton

Starring: Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, Alicia Vikander


REVIEW AUTHOR: Rob Stoakes

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Themes and analogy have never been that far away from blockbuster films, even if you don’t think that they have, and this year has been a prime indicator for that. Kingsman was on the surface a Bond parody and homage, but had strong themes of class warfare. It Follows seems to follow the old horror tradition of monsters murdering sexually active teenagers, but the monster can also be seen to represent STIs, maturity and death. The film doesn’t even need to be particularly complex; Mad Max: Fury Road is essentially a feminist outline of the dangers of worshiping hyper-masculinity and one of the most unflinching looks at people as property in recent cinema history.

So what’s on Guy Ritchie’s mind? If The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is any indicator, it would be opposites. When you notice the theme, it suddenly becomes inescapable. There’s obvious stuff, like how the capitalist U.S.A and communist U.S.S.R are working together and how everyone in the film seems to not be at all bothered about the threat of a nuclear holocaust, but it goes deeper than that. Continue reading