The Most Underrated Horror Films of the 2010s

Underrated horror moviesAh, October. For department stores it means it’s time to put up Christmas decorations, for kids it means it’s the one time they can ask people for candy without repercussions, and for cinephiles, it means it’s time to start watching horror films. Every year, we get horror films that get put on pedestals.

Some of those films deserve them like Get Out or Hereditary, while others do not such as It: Chapter 2 or mother! However, what about the films that should be on a pedestal, but aren’t. I’m not talking about the films that are loved by a wide majority of people have seen and enjoyed like Cabin in the Woods or Overlord. I’m talking about the movies that even most film majors I know haven’t seen and always say “Oh, I really want to see that!” These are the films that I really want to talk about today, so without any more delay, here are the horror films I believe to be the most underrated of the decade.  Continue reading

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark review “Guillermo del Toro makes a solid creepy movie! Shock!”

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark poster“Euhuheh” – A quote from me in four separate scenes in Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. After either the first or second trailer, I can’t remember which, I was really worried about this movie. It appeared to be the standard scares that you’ll find in any PG-13 horror film like Escape Room or Happy Death Day 2U, as well as the pretty bad CG Ghost of Sarah Bellows, and that scared me going into it.

Then the reviews were positive and I became optimistic, so when I saw this film on opening weekend, I had a sense of cautious optimism. As the credits rolled, I found myself relieved, as this is the second best horror film of 2019. So, let’s get into Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.  Continue reading

Midsommar review “Ari Aster does it again”

Midsommar movie posterWatch the walls. Director Ari Aster’s advice to cinema-goers heading out to see his second directorial feature may seem strange, but it makes sense once you see it. Aster’s Hereditary (2018) follow-up is sunny, funny and so pretty you barely notice the horror.

Our protagonist Dani is reaching the end of a four-year relationship with Christian (Jack Reynor), an uninterested, inattentive boyfriend who wanted to end it months ago but stayed with Dani when tragedy befalls her and her family. Dani joins Christian and his pals Josh (William Jackson Harper), Mark (Will Poulter) and Swedish native Pelle (Vilhelm Blomgren) for a nine day once-in-a-lifetime festival celebrating midsommar in Pelle’s hometown of Halsingland. Continue reading

Us review “Smart and stylish”

Us movie posterPeele’s sudden and swift success with Get Out (2017) left many wondering if the sketch comedian turned director really could be the horror pantheon’s saviour. After a lean half century brimming with blood, gore and gratuitous torture porn, the genre emerged into something of a renaissance. Following the release of Get Out came a swath of imaginative and intelligent thrillers like Raw (2016), The Babadook (2014) and It Follows (2014) and the horror genre began to establish itself as the go-to vehicle for social commentary.

By far the most commercially successful iteration was Get Out, which grossed just over $250 million worldwide. But after such overwhelming success, could Peele really do it again with Us? Well, the answer is yes. Just as Get Out was a chilling survival horror that had oh-so-relevant things to say about the African-American experience, Us is a chilling survival horror that equally has a significant amount to say about duality, privilege and the swelling vein of apathy running through the heart of America. Continue reading

Bird Box review “Unbelievably tense”

Birdbox posterThe end of the world has been presented in many different ways. Huge natural disasters, aliens, even humans themselves, have been responsible for the apocalypse. However, Netflix’s newest release, Bird Box, won’t let you see what is causing the end of the world – because it makes you die.

Bird Box follows Malorie (Sandra Bullock), a pregnant woman who is desperately trying to survive a world where people keep randomly committing suicide after seeing an unknown entity. Continue reading