The First Purge review “Yet another wasted opportunity”

The First Purge posterYes! Get in! Finally, the producers over at Platinum Dunes and Blumhouse realised that what fans of the Purge series were wanting was a look at how the night of legalised crime came to be. It’s all we’ve been asking for since 2013 after all.

After three films of decent quality in which the second, Purge: Anarchy is the highlight, The First Purge promises to shake up the formula by introducing a prequel into the horror franchise. But does it do enough to stop the series from feeling stale or are we looking at yet another paint-by-numbers horror flick? Continue reading

Ghost Stories review “A horror movie that doesn’t fall flat”

Ghost Stories movie posterA horror film is a hard thing to do well. Most horror movies are predictable, with overused tropes and twists turning the story from scary, to sub-par. Ghost Stories, from writers and directors Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman, is one of those horror movies that doesn’t fall flat.

Ghost Stories follows arch-skeptic Phillip Goodman (Andy Nyman), as he stumbles across a long-lost file containing three cases of inexplicable hauntings. With demons, ghostly little girls and a surprising twist, this movie is the epitome of a horror film. Continue reading

Super Dark Times review “A film that disturbs you into watching”

Super Dark Times posterIndie horrors are often classed as some of the best ones out there. It Follows, The Blair Witch Project and Saw are all examples of the indie horror genre creating something, a story so disturbing and chilling, that it lingers. Netflix has done that with Super Dark Times.

Super Dark Times follows best friends Zach and Josh as they navigate teenage life in the 1990s. However, a gruesome accident leads to a secret they need to keep, which eventually drives a wedge between them, propelling them down a rabbit hole of escalating paranoia and violence. Continue reading

The Babysitter review “How not to be a babysitter”

The Babysitter posterWho doesn’t like a comedy horror movie? They combine the best of both worlds: the sadistic, gore-loving, blood-drenched genre of horror, and cheesy, light-hearted, laughs. However, it is a fine art to master. Netflix’s latest stab at the pastiche, The Babysitter, is definitely a good attempt. Is it, however, art?

The answer, in short, is no. It’s not art, but it’s thoroughly entertaining throughout its 85-minute running time. As far as horror-comedies go, it isn’t the worst.

The film follows Cole (Judah Lewis) as he spies on his babysitter after his bedtime, only to find out that she is the head of a satanic cult. What follows are a series of deaths and attempted deaths, all varying in extremeness and graphic content. Continue reading

Folk Horror Revival Movies of the Decade: Top 5

Folk horror movie postersThe countryside, cults and the occasional demonic goat. The sub-genre of folk horror extols and explores all the dark, dreamy and often macabre elements of the folk sort.

A term first coined by Piers Haggard (director of ‘Blood on Satan’s Claw’) and later popularised by Mark Gatiss in the BBC documentary A History of Horror, folk horror is built upon a feeling of isolation and paranoia as thick as the fog that shrouds the haunted landscapes of its setting.

Bleeding into the early 70s from the heady highs of the late 1960s, the genre found its roots in the now infamous ‘Unholy Trilogy’: Haggard’s ‘Blood on Satan’s Claw’ (1971), ‘The Witchfinder General’ (1968) by Michael Reeves and ‘The Wickerman’ (1973) by Robin Hardy. This trifecta of films defined a generation of horror obsessed with the unflinching wilderness both within and around us. Continue reading