Mission: Impossible – Fallout review “Cruise and Mcquarrie Do It Again”

Mission: Impossible Fallout posterThe year: 1996. In between From Dusk til Dawn and Independence Day came yet another 90s TV to movie adaptation, Mission: Impossible. As you can see 22 years later, it certainly succeeded as the sixth installment in the franchise was released, Mission: Impossible – Fallout.

Being the sixth in the franchise surprisingly still presents a lot of firsts with the first recurring director in Christopher McQuarrie, first recurring leading female in Rebecca Ferguson’s Ilsa Faust, and the first recurring villain in Sean Harris’s Solomon Lane. However, did the return of many key roles lead to a movie as fun and exciting as Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, or do we have another Mission: Impossible II on our hands. Let’s delve into that. Continue reading

“The Transformers of the superhero genre” Batman v Superman review

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By Adam Brannon

It feels like eons ago that Batman v Superman was announced as a genuine movie. Way back in 2007 there was a poster that seemed to signify DC Comic’s plans in I am Legend, but fans just thought of it as a pipedream.

Now, in 2016, the moment has finally arrived. The marketing campaign has been relentless, the trailers have been criticised for showing far too much (which they have), and Ben Affleck’s casting as Batman was met with disdain rather than joy. So what is the finished product like? Continue reading

“The most Guy Ritchie-est film ever” The Man From U.N.C.L.E review

THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.  (UK CERT: 12A)

Director: Guy Ritchie  

Music: Daniel Pemberton

Starring: Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, Alicia Vikander


REVIEW AUTHOR: Rob Stoakes

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Copyright: Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Themes and analogy have never been that far away from blockbuster films, even if you don’t think that they have, and this year has been a prime indicator for that. Kingsman was on the surface a Bond parody and homage, but had strong themes of class warfare. It Follows seems to follow the old horror tradition of monsters murdering sexually active teenagers, but the monster can also be seen to represent STIs, maturity and death. The film doesn’t even need to be particularly complex; Mad Max: Fury Road is essentially a feminist outline of the dangers of worshiping hyper-masculinity and one of the most unflinching looks at people as property in recent cinema history.

So what’s on Guy Ritchie’s mind? If The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is any indicator, it would be opposites. When you notice the theme, it suddenly becomes inescapable. There’s obvious stuff, like how the capitalist U.S.A and communist U.S.S.R are working together and how everyone in the film seems to not be at all bothered about the threat of a nuclear holocaust, but it goes deeper than that. Continue reading