On Chesil Beach review “Brimming with English melancholy”

On Chesil Beach posterThe pebble beaches, brooding grey skies and that familiar reserved English melancholy of Ian McEwan’s novella On Chesil Beach have been meticulously translated into film, adapted by the author himself and directed by Dominic Cooke, this being his debut feature film. Starring Saoirse Ronan and Billy Howle as the polite yet passionately in love pair, it’s a tender ode to what it’s like to fall in love in your early twenties.

On Chesil Beach is the story of Florence and Edward, two young graduates who are about to be married in the summer of 1962. Florence is a fiercely talented and ambitious violinist from a upper-middle class family, daughter to a factory owner (Samuel West) and a philosophy professor (Emily Watson). Edward is just as wickedly smart but from far humbler beginnings. Continue reading

Isle of Dogs review “Man’s best friend”

Isle of Dogs posterIf you’re familiar with the work of Wes Anderson, you’ll know what to expect from his films: oddball characters, immaculate set design, a quirky plot and an immaculately assembled ensemble cast. In his latest feature, Isle of Dogs, Anderson not only meets your expectations but exceeds them.

The story is set in future Japan, where all dogs have been quarantined on Trash Island due to an outbreak of highly contagious dog-flu. A young boy, Atari, flies to the island, in order to find his beloved guard dog, Spots.

First, let’s start off by saying this: this movie is a masterpiece. It has heart, it has beauty and it has a screenplay that most movies could only dream of having. It’s sharp, witty and perfectly crafted. Continue reading

Pacific Rim moments: Top 5

Pacific Rim Top 5 MomentsSo Pacific Rim: Uprising is less than a week away from hitting cinemas across the UK. Unbelievably it has taken five years to create this sequel to one of 2013’s most underrated films. Pacific Rim was criticised for its by-the-numbers plot but this Del Toro movie was much more than giant monsters and robots fighting.

In fact, it was director Guillermo Del Toro’s first real mass-market blockbuster. Sure Hellboy and its sequel The Golden Army were comic-book stories, but they never had the mass appeal of say, the Transformers series, which Pacific Rim can be at times, quite a lot like. With Uprising hitting cinemas very soon, I thought it was high-time to look back through its predecessor and pick out five moments that make it stand out from the rest of the blockbuster crowd. Continue reading

Mute review “Unnecessarily quiet”

Mute movie posterIt is likely that many people would assume a film with a lead character that cannot speak, wouldn’t do very well. 2018, however, has proved this wrong, with The Shape of Water winning four Oscars at the Academy Awards this year. Netflix has jumped on the bandwagon of unconventional leads, releasing Mute, directed by Duncan Jones.

Mute follows a mute, Amish barman called Leo, as he looks for his blue-haired girlfriend Naadirah in the gangster-ridden city of Berlin. With a stellar cast, amazing CGI and the director of Moon at the helm, it would be surprising if this movie was anything less than great. Continue reading

Game Night review “Perfect popcorn comedy”

Game Night posterReading that Game Night is by the same guys that brought you Horrible Bosses may seem not sound like a selling point, and you could be forgiven in running as fast as you can in the opposition direction, but please, don’t let it put you off.

Game Night is a (moderately) witty, self-aware, screwball comedy with enough titters and twists to keep you entertained to the end. John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein may have fallen short on Horrible Bosses (they only wrote the screenplay) but prove to be a winning combination in the director’s chair. Continue reading