Baby Driver vs Drive: Celluloid Clash

Celluloid ClashTwo films, two usually silent main characters, two British-born actresses as love interests, and two super awesome jackets. Both Drive and Baby Driver are among my favorite films of all time, with their immense style, amazing direction, top-notch editing, and truly thrilling action.

However, the debate rages on about which of the two films is better, the 2011 Ryan Gosling vehicle or the 2017 Ansel Elgort film. Now, while I do have a preference, I decided to see examine them in five key categories to see what was truly the best. Those five categories are storytelling, acting, characters, visuals, and overall enjoyability. All there is left to do is compare the two, and now it’s time for our first ever Celluloid Clash. Continue reading

Stan & Ollie review “It’s not Bohemian Rhapsody, that’s for sure”

Stan & Ollie movie posterAfter Stan & Ollie finished, all I could think of was Bohemian Rhapsody. This was not unusual for me at the time. Bryan Singer’s travesty that we were politely referring to as a “movie” had really wormed its way into my psyche. Not just because it was so bad— and it was so unbelievably bad— but also because everyone seemed to like it. When I asked anyone why their answer was “it’s about Queen, why wouldn’t I like it?”

This shouldn’t surprise me, of course, people love biopics. There’s something exciting about seeing people who were real brought to life on screen. The issue is that biopics are often awful. There exists, I think, a desire to capture every part of a person’s life. Continue reading

Struck review “A supremely stylish indie flick”

Struck movie posterIt’s hard to critique indie cinema with quite the same vigour as you might a mainstream blockbuster flick. Often huge differences in budget and production quality make comparison virtually impossible; but usually what indie flicks often lack in production quality, they compensate for in narrative ‘gumption’ and imagination.

Struck, an indie teen drama from rookie filmmakers Alexander Milo Bischof and Michael Couvaras, subverts these expectations. Favouring production quality over narrative originality, Struck is an ambitious attempt at rehashing a familiar story for a millennial audience. Continue reading

Cold Pursuit review “Neeson’s best film in years”

Cold Pursuit movie posterYes, we all know the jokes. Liam Neeson’s spiral into revenge thriller territory is one of the most meme-worthy things in film, except maybe John Travolta and Battlefield Earth. Starting with Taken and its, let’s be honest, dreadful sequels, the Irish actor has made a name for himself as the go-to guy to rough someone up after a spate of bad-luck.

He’s had kids killed, kidnapped and spouses murdered in cold blood, he’s even been framed for hijacking a jumbo jet – if anyone deserves a break, it’s Liam Neeson. Unfortunately, his films have ranged from great (Taken, Non-Stop), to middling (Run All Night, The Commuter), to downright dreadful (Taken 2, Taken 3) and that’s how the meme-worthiness was born. Nevertheless, Neeson is back for yet another revenge thriller in Cold Pursuit. But how does it stack up? Continue reading

Alita: Battle Angel review “A visual spectacle”

Alita: Battle Angel movie posterIt’s always a worry when a production company feels the need to force feed you the fact that a big-name is in a relatively minor role. In the case of Alita: Battle Angel, 20th Century Fox have been hammering home the fact that James Cameron is involved in a Producer capacity.

You have to feel a little sorry for director Robert Rodriguez as his name has been almost usurped by Cameron’s in the marketing push for this live-action adaptation of the classic manga. Of course, Cameron is too busy making the four Avatar sequels no-one actually cares about anymore and instead, entrusted his vision for Alita: Battle Angel to Rodriguez. He’s certainly an intriguing choice of director, but does the finished product work? Continue reading