The films that influenced me: Jesse Williams

Influential films for Jesse Williams

Film has always been a part of my life. From going to the cinema for the first time on my second birthday, to watching films with my dad, it’s something that has always felt special to me. As someone who grew up in a house with a ridiculously sized DVD collection, and a father who collected Empire magazine, movies became hard to avoid.

The films in this list either resonated with me for a very specific reason, or hold some nostalgia that I will never be able to shake. Ultimately, they all hold a very special place both in my heart, and my life.

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High school movies: Top 5

top 5 high school moviesWell, it finally happened. By the time this article is published I will have likely graduated High School. Gotta say, it’s been a long time coming and I can’t wait to have all the hallmarks of a senior year at the end of this long ro- Coronavirus? Oh, that’s not going to happen anymore, is it? Covid-19 cut a lot of senior years short, along with mine, so to counteract this, in between the best picture winners and Bond films I’ve been watching, I’ve also been watching and rewatching a few classic high school films.

They range from the decent like Fast Times at Ridgemont High, the meh Pretty in Pink, or the totally overrated and terrible Superbad. So because of this, I decided to give my top five movies about high school. I did debate about what films would be on this list. I ultimately decided that just because a movie’s starring roles are mainly high schoolers does not qualify, so movies like Lady Bird, Risky Business, and Rushmore don’t make the list. Continue reading

The impacts of coronavirus on the film industry

The impacts of coronavirus on the film industry“The world will never be the same again.” Sounds dramatic doesn’t it? But that’s just what many are predicting the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic will be after over 600,000 cases and more than 20,000 deaths have been reported across the globe.

Economies are struggling and millions of people have lost, or are in the process of losing, their jobs. This catastrophic virus has turned the lives of ordinary folk like you and me upside down. One industry that has had to adapt to change incredibly quickly is film. In this special article, founder and editor Adam Brannon looks at how this virus could change the landscape of the film industry forever. Continue reading

Jojo Rabbit review ‘Monty Python, but in Nazi Germany’

JoJo Rabbit posterAh, the beauty of childhood. Running around with your best friends, making your own fun. It’s highly likely, however, that your childhood didn’t involve being a part of the Hitler Youth. Well, in the newest movie from triple-threat, Taika Waititi, it features just that. As well as, you know, the Gestapo, public hangings, and actual Hitler himself.

It doesn’t go amiss to question why such a successful comedy filmmaker would tackle such a risky subject. What also doesn’t go amiss, however, is how the story of Jojo Rabbit is handled. The movie follows Jojo, a 10 year old lad born in Germany in WWII.

His dedication to the war effort is apparent from the off – he marches around in his Hitler Youth uniform, knife readied in his belt, with his imaginary friend (who just happens to be Waititi as Hitler) issues rallying cries of support for his tiny friend. His mother (Scarlett Johansson) is quick-witted, unapologetic, and fiendishly brave. It seems as though its them and Hitler against the world, until Jojo makes a discovery in his very own house. Continue reading

Unpopular Opinion: Ridley Scott hasn’t made a good film since Gladiator

Ridley Scott hasn't made a great film since GladiatorMake no mistake about it, Ridley Scott’s early, pre-2000s career is littered with enduring classics and hidden gems. Blade Runner, to this day, remains one of the greatest science fiction films ever made. Thelma and Louise remains an immensely enjoyable, girl power-fuelled joyride that holds up so well it’s perhaps more impactful now than it was at the time of release. And 1977’s The Duellists (Scott’s directorial debut) remains a well crafted and considered film.

To experience Ridley Scott as his peak though, we must travel all the way back to 1982. Following the release of Alien and Blade Runner in quick succession, Scott had not only established himself as one of Britain’s best filmmakers, he’d claimed his place as the premier director within the science fiction genre. Alien, quite rightly, is regarded as a masterpiece hybrid of sci-fi and horror. And Blade Runner, one of my favourite films, is without a doubt one of the greatest, pure science fiction movies ever conceived. Continue reading