The Lion King review “A technical marvel”

The Lion King posterAnother month, another Disney remake. After audiences and critics alike were underwhelmed by Tim Burton’s bizarre take on Dumbo, tensions were high with the releases of Aladdin and The Lion King. Thankfully, the former was a colourful, spirited adventure that updated the 1992 classic for the modern-age.

It also has grossed nearly $1billion to-date, but that’s by-the-by – what am I saying, of course it’s not. Money speaks volumes. Nevertheless, The Lion King is perhaps the biggest risk Disney has ever made. It’s arguably the most-loved animation in the studio’s back-catalogue. Think of Aladdin and Dumbo as a litmus test and you wouldn’t be far wrong.

Thankfully, Disney were well aware of this and assembled a strike force of film-makers and actors to ensure this adaptation is as good as it possibly can be. Bringing in The Jungle Book director Jon Favreau was a good idea and his reimagining of that classic performed very well with both critics and audiences. But has he buckled under the pressure? Or is The Lion King a treat for the senses? Continue reading

Booksmart review “A surprisingly realistic fantasy”

Booksmart movie posterHaving gone to three high schools myself during my teenage tenure, I feel like I have more knowledge about different kinds of high schools than the average person. That being said, if the things that happened in this movie happen, I must have missed out because Booksmart is freaking insane. It’s a good insane, one of my favourite comedies ever made insane, but insane regardless. The directorial debut of Olivia Wilde is the best comedy I’ve seen since Game Night, which was also among my favourite films of the year. Enough lollygagging though, let’s dive into Booksmart.

So the best thing about Booksmart is the comedy, and it is so funny. For a movie to actually get an audible laugh from me is rare. Does it happen from time to time? Yeah, I audibly chuckled a few times in Long Shot, and I had probably one or two extended laughs during Isn’t it Romantic, but my laughter in Booksmart was just constant. The lengths that our heroes go to in order to prove that they’re cool is astounding and the ways that they mess up in this endeavour are even funnier. Continue reading

Spider-Man: Far From Home review “Marvel’s Phase 3 comes to a melancholic end”

Spider-Man: Far From Home posterSpider-Man: Homecoming was one of the biggest surprises in the superhero genre. After the masked web-slinger’s troubled history on the big screen, Marvel intervened and took the story back to basics. With a compelling villain in Michael Keaton’s Vulture, Homecoming shot to the top of many MCU rankings and it’s easy to see why.

Ending Phase Three of the MCU was never going to be easy, especially after the drama of this year’s Avengers: Endgame, but Tom Holland’s Peter Parker has been tasked with tying up all those loose ends. So how does he do? Continue reading

After review “Fifty Shades lacking steaminess”

After movie posterOkay, I’ve said this four times this year so far, but this has gotta be the worst movie of the year. First, I said it for Captive State, then I said it for Hellboy, then The Challenger Disaster, and now, we’ve wound up here at After. How exactly did this movie come to be made?

For those who don’t know, this is based off of a One Direction fan fiction created on Wattpad (Which has previously given us movies such as The Kissing Booth) which eventually spun off into a five book series including one installment called After Ever Happy. So, somehow this turned into a movie starring Selma Blair from Cruel Intentions for a whopping five minutes and that kid who played Tom Riddle in The Half Blood Prince. There is no use in prolonging this any longer, let’s get into After. Continue reading

Someone Great review “A very important movie”

Someone Great movie posterAs lovely as some of the older romantic comedies may be, a lot of them are a bit out of date nowadays. From the lack of feminist perspectives, to the multitude of damsels in distress, it’s refreshing when a movie strays from the status quo. One of Netflix’s newer releases, Someone Great, takes the appeal of a rom-com, but adds a 21st-century twist.

Someone Great follows Jenny, as she navigates the collapse of her nine-year long relationship on her last night in New York. Her two friends, Blair and Erin, help her enjoy her newly single self, whilst also making everlasting memories with each other on their very last evening together. Continue reading