Justice League Dark: Apokolips War review “Avengers: Meh-ndgame”

Justice League Dark: Apokolips War posterBefore I was the movie aficionado we all know and begrudgingly tolerate, I was a different kind of aficionado, one of DC comic books. Due to this, I find the DC Animated Universe very interesting, as they can tell the stories that I loved to read years ago like Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay and give the story it’s due, while the DCEU films about those same stories like Suicide Squad fall flat on its face, onto a set of stairs, tumbling down them and breaking every single bone. The DCAU has virtually led to this.

Aside from a few very interesting diversions into the multiverse such as Superman: Red Son or Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, the story of the DCAU has all been building to Darkseid destroying Earth with films like Reign of the Supermen and Justice League: War all coming to a head here. Last year showed us that it is possible for major superhero franchises that have been going on for years to end a storyline really well with Avengers: Endgame. In fact, Endgame did such a good job at this, that Apokolips War lifts a large amount of it’s story from Endgame. Continue reading

Scoob! review “ruh roh”

Scoob! movie poster

Putting on a Scooby Doo movie is the truest form of gambling. You can end up with a great time with something like Scooby-Doo: Pirates Ahoy and Scooby-Doo: Stage Fright, or you could see Scooby-Doo and WWE: Curse of the Speed Demon and Scooby Doo and KISS: Rock and Roll Mystery (The crossovers aren’t great). As I am the world’s foremost expert on the subject of Mystery Incorporated and their many endeavors, I approached the newest theatrical, well, almost theatrical, film, Scoob, with cautious optimism.

The first trailer made it look like it’d be a fun, enjoyable time. Then came the second trailer, followed by the countless ads on Vudu, which made my excitement tailspin. Then I bought, yes, bought the movie so I could watch it forever and ever. To put it mildly, this is the film equivalent of Scrappy Doo, because it’s the worst Scooby related material. I can’t put the pain of reliving the movie any longer, “pets” talk about Scoob.

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Retro Review – Goldfinger: The blueprint for spy films

Goldfinger posterNo Time to Die was originally supposed to be released at the end of April. I had my tickets and everything. During my time in Quarantine, I’ve tried to satisfy my Bond craving in many ways. Watching the 1967 Casino Royale, which was actually the only Bond film that I hadn’t seen, listening to the Bond soundtrack while getting groceries, and writing my own script for a Bond film called More Time to Kill, but after the death of Honor Blackman last month, I rewatched 1964’s Goldfinger.

I have a ton of memories involving Goldfinger, for the most part involving the levels in the videogame 007 Legends, but it was always one of the few Connery’s that actually grabbed me. I also want to preface this review with the fact that I don’t want to use the word iconic too many times in this review, so I replaced every time I say “Iconic” with a song from Abba. So, to prevent us from killing more time, let’s start on Goldfinger. Continue reading

The Willoughbys review “A childhood fever dream”

The Willoughby's poster

Animated kids films have, over the years, gone from strength to strength. With franchises like Toy Story and Frozen, and indie animations like 2019’s Klaus, it’s clear to see that children are hardly deprived of top-notch filmmaking. Netflix’s latest foray into the cartoon business is The Willoughbys: an energetic, colourful, and plain weird take on family life, based on the book by Lois Lowry.

The Willoughbys follows the Willoughby family: a red haired, spectacularly moustachioed cohort that are known, throughout history, for doing creative and courageous things. However, Mother and Father Willoughby are more interested in each other than their four children, leaving them to live with no food, no fun, and no love. After a child is left on their doorstep one night, the Willoughby children hatch a plan to become orphans themselves – but it doesn’t quite go how they were planning.

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Emma. review “A case of style over substance”

Emma. movie posterJane Austen is responsible for many of the world’s most beloved romance novels. From Pride and Prejudice, to Sense and Sensibility, she has paved the way for the modern rom-com. Her tales have graced both the big and little screen in the form of period dramas, and 90s LA girl fantasies.

However, Emma (arguably Austen’s funniest work) isn’t necessarily the first novel you think of when you think about the iconic author. Its most recent adaptation, directed by Autumn de Wilde, is a full-on, aesthetic overload, with frills left, right, and centre. But, is it any good? Continue reading