Home Again review “Shallow and contrived”

Home Again posterWatching Home Again is an experience akin to drinking an entire bottle of a Muscat-Blanc. It’s deliciously sweet and gets you all giddy to begin with but ultimately you’re going to wake up  with a head-ache. The debut feature from Hallie Meyers-Shyer, daughter of the genre empress Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer, continues the family tradition of the perky female rom-com with a keen eye for soft furnishings and pristine kitchen-ware.

Alice (Reese Witherspoon) plays a recently separated mother of two going through a bit of a rough patch. By rough patch I mean that she is unable to truly express herself in her work as an interior designer, whilst living in a plush LA mansion she inherited (along with a comfortable bank account) from her deceased millionaire father, who was once the darling of old Hollywood gentry. Because you know, money isn’t everything. Continue reading

Alita: Battle Angel review “A visual spectacle”

Alita: Battle Angel movie posterIt’s always a worry when a production company feels the need to force feed you the fact that a big-name is in a relatively minor role. In the case of Alita: Battle Angel, 20th Century Fox have been hammering home the fact that James Cameron is involved in a Producer capacity.

You have to feel a little sorry for director Robert Rodriguez as his name has been almost usurped by Cameron’s in the marketing push for this live-action adaptation of the classic manga. Of course, Cameron is too busy making the four Avatar sequels no-one actually cares about anymore and instead, entrusted his vision for Alita: Battle Angel to Rodriguez. He’s certainly an intriguing choice of director, but does the finished product work? Continue reading

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World review “A fitting franchise closer”

How to Train Your Dragon 3 posterOf all the oddly specific sub-genres out there my personal favourite is, without a doubt, the “boy and his (insert strange creature that they befriend here)” coming-of-age film. In these films a child, usually a boy but sometimes a girl, finds a strange fantasy or science-fiction creature that is not of this world who they form an unlikely bond with.

It’s a sub-genre whose catalogue includes great films like E.T the Extra-Terrestrial, Pete’s Dragon and Flight of the Navigator. Whole franchises are built out of it; the Pokémon movies the live-action Transformers (especially the recent Bumblebee) are just two examples. If I had to choose a personal favourite it would be The Iron Giant. If I had to choose a second favourite it would be 2010’s How to Train Your Dragon. Continue reading

Polar review “Oh dear”

Polar movie posterThe humble graphic novel has paved the way for many of the iconic movies we know and love today: Watchmen, Scott Pilgrim vs The World and 300 to name but a few.  Netflix’s latest release is a foray into that elusive world of the graphic novel, bringing gory hitman tale Polar to our TV screens. However, did it translate on screen as it did on paper?

Polar follows world-renowned assassin Duncan (Mads Mikkelsen) as he prepares for his retirement at the age of 50. Against his will, Duncan is forced back into his killing ways when he is pursued by a group of people who want him dead. Continue reading

Summer of 84 review “Blood, gore and nostalgia”

Summer of 84 movie posterThe 1980’s has become a ‘flavour of the month’ for many a medium in the 21st century. Maybe it’s because the filmmakers of today were the children of the 1980s, or maybe it’s just because the 1980’s is one of the most idealised periods of time. Children riding on bikes, nothing to be scared of. However, Summer of 84 would disagree that there’s nothing for kids to be scared of, even in the 80s.

Summer of 84 follows a group of kids as they try to prove that their next door neighbour, Mr Mackey, is a notorious serial killer. As with all good homages to the 80s, it’s got good music, bad fashion and a lot of walkie talkies. Continue reading