Celluloid Clash: Frozen v Tangled

Frozen vs TangledIn my job of handling finances and food distribution at a multi-billion dollar conglomerate (A concessions worker at a Regal movie theatre), I work with several people of varying beliefs and movie tastes, so when Frozen II came out, a debate sparked. Which early 2010s Disney animated film featuring a girl with magical powers (And/or her sister) leaving her confined castle and teaming up with a charming blue collar worker, a horse, and another peculiar sidekick against a villain who pretends to love the hero only to betray them to win power is better, Frozen or Tangled.

This is a question you hear asked a lot, and for the reason of bringing this argument to a close, I opted to rewatch both of these films (because it’s still shorter than watching The Irishman) to finally figure it out. I did have to make one or two changes to the criteria for this installment though, mainly due to the fact that I thought the songs were more important in this comparison than the voice acting was. So, without any more delays, let’s dive right into the third installment of Celluloid Clash.  Continue reading

Uncut Gems review “A 20 carat experience”

Uncut Gems posterGoing into this movie, I was torn. Because while I love so many things about this premise, a dark comedy about crime and basketball, starring one of my favorite NBA players of all time, Kevin Garnett, but it also has Adam Sandler, who has only ever been in one movie that I enjoy, and that’s surprisingly Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation.

So I was somewhat dreading seeing Uncut Gems, so when I finally got a chance to see it, I was pretty cautiously optimistic, knowing that I have been burned by 2019 releases with great reviews many times. (Thinking of you Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, for the first time in months) Anyway, after all sitting through the film, I can say without a doubt, that it not only lives up to the hype, but is also such an insanely odd movie, that it’s impossible to not understand why someone wouldn’t like it. So let’s get into Uncut Gems. Continue reading

Little Women review “Lightning in a bottle”

Little Women posterLittle Women is one of those stories that doesn’t age. It’s heartfelt, heartwrenching, and outright gorgeous. Even when the first feature length version was released back in 1994, it brought to life the sense of sisterhood that burns so brightly in the book. However, when Greta Gerwig announced her rendition of the beloved novel, complete with all-star cast, amazing composer and an Oscar-nominated director (herself), it’s not hard to see why people could barely contain their excitement.

If you haven’t read the book, please do. But if you don’t have time before you read this review, hereby commences the whistlestop tour of Little Women. It focuses around four sisters: Meg, the eldest; Jo, the most ‘boyish’; Beth, the most perfect; and Amy, the youngest and most divisive. It tracks their journey from youth to adulthood, along with their romances, heartbreaks, and tragedies. It’s one of those books that lingers like ink on your finger, like the smell of smoke after you blow out a candle. It sticks. Continue reading

1917 review “A flawless masterpiece”

1917 movie posterI really wasn’t all that interested in 1917 during the build up to its release. Even following the successful pre-release screenings on the 4th of December, I couldn’t muster up any interest in what looked to be yet another generic war film. Sure, the trailer was solid, and the film had a swathe of big names attached to it, but nobody I had spoken to was particularly excited about actually seeing it.

My interest piqued however when reviews started rolling in, the film was being both praised critically and received well commercially. Still, I had my reservations. Historical war films tend to garner a lot of interest due to the sentimental themes and shocking imagery they portray. So what if it has 10 Oscar nominations? Once Upon A Time In Hollywood does too, and that was a self-indulgent bore fest. Continue reading

Jojo Rabbit review ‘Monty Python, but in Nazi Germany’

JoJo Rabbit posterAh, the beauty of childhood. Running around with your best friends, making your own fun. It’s highly likely, however, that your childhood didn’t involve being a part of the Hitler Youth. Well, in the newest movie from triple-threat, Taika Waititi, it features just that. As well as, you know, the Gestapo, public hangings, and actual Hitler himself.

It doesn’t go amiss to question why such a successful comedy filmmaker would tackle such a risky subject. What also doesn’t go amiss, however, is how the story of Jojo Rabbit is handled. The movie follows Jojo, a 10 year old lad born in Germany in WWII.

His dedication to the war effort is apparent from the off – he marches around in his Hitler Youth uniform, knife readied in his belt, with his imaginary friend (who just happens to be Waititi as Hitler) issues rallying cries of support for his tiny friend. His mother (Scarlett Johansson) is quick-witted, unapologetic, and fiendishly brave. It seems as though its them and Hitler against the world, until Jojo makes a discovery in his very own house. Continue reading