The Disaster Artist review “Meticulously crafted”

The Disaster Artist posterThe experience of watching Tommy Wiseau’s ‘The Room’ should always be a shared one; that is, after you wade your way through the nonsensical plot lines and outlandishly bad yet perennially quotable dialogue, you may need someone there with whom to voice, what did I just watch?

Watching ‘The Room’ is a thought-provoking experience and one that leaves you full of questions like; How do bad movies get made? Who pays for them? Who made this bad movie and why am I enjoying it so much? And who is that guy with a face like Churchill’s left nut sack? Continue reading

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool review “A smorgasbord of talent”

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool posterIn the late 70s, Peter Turner was living in a boarding house in Primrose Hill.  Among his fellow lodgers was Gloria Grahame, a once revered but now fading Hollywood siren, who happened to be playing Sadie in a production of Somerset Maugham’s ‘Rain’ at the Watford Place. This is how they met.

What followed was a two year whirlwind romance that ultimately ended in tragedy. Based on Turner’s memoir of the same name, ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’ is a poignant and intimate portrayal of Gloria’s final days from director Paul McGuigan. Continue reading

Folk Horror Revival Movies of the Decade: Top 5

Folk horror movie postersThe countryside, cults and the occasional demonic goat. The sub-genre of folk horror extols and explores all the dark, dreamy and often macabre elements of the folk sort.

A term first coined by Piers Haggard (director of ‘Blood on Satan’s Claw’) and later popularised by Mark Gatiss in the BBC documentary A History of Horror, folk horror is built upon a feeling of isolation and paranoia as thick as the fog that shrouds the haunted landscapes of its setting.

Bleeding into the early 70s from the heady highs of the late 1960s, the genre found its roots in the now infamous ‘Unholy Trilogy’: Haggard’s ‘Blood on Satan’s Claw’ (1971), ‘The Witchfinder General’ (1968) by Michael Reeves and ‘The Wickerman’ (1973) by Robin Hardy. This trifecta of films defined a generation of horror obsessed with the unflinching wilderness both within and around us. Continue reading