Retro Review – Reservoir Dogs: Tarantino at his raw, unrefined best

Reservoir Dogs posterAfter last year’s bitterly disappointing Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, which presumably only received an Oscar nomination because of its subject matter, I decided it was time to revisit some of Tarantino’s classics. I’ve always been a huge fan of his work, but Once Upon A Time in Hollywood was such a drab, underwhelming, damp squib of a movie, I actually started to question my Tarantino loyalty.

Reservoir Dogs is a film that I have always hugely enjoyed though and, having not seen it for a good few years, what better place to start? The film was initially released in 1992 and the story behind production is a quite an interesting one. Made on a meagre budget ($1.2 million), Tarantino had to beg, borrow and steal to get his debut film made. Continue reading

1917 review “A flawless masterpiece”

1917 movie posterI really wasn’t all that interested in 1917 during the build up to its release. Even following the successful pre-release screenings on the 4th of December, I couldn’t muster up any interest in what looked to be yet another generic war film. Sure, the trailer was solid, and the film had a swathe of big names attached to it, but nobody I had spoken to was particularly excited about actually seeing it.

My interest piqued however when reviews started rolling in, the film was being both praised critically and received well commercially. Still, I had my reservations. Historical war films tend to garner a lot of interest due to the sentimental themes and shocking imagery they portray. So what if it has 10 Oscar nominations? Once Upon A Time In Hollywood does too, and that was a self-indulgent bore fest. Continue reading

The Star Wars Saga: Ranked

Star Wars franchise reviewThe Rise of Skywalker is finally here! To mark the occasion, let’s take a look back at the entire Star Wars universe, dogmatically review each and every film and create the ultimate and undisputed franchise guide.

If there’s anything you can rely on Star Wars fans for, it’s their vehement passion for George Lucas’s galaxy far, far away. With this mind, I am fully expecting to ruffle a few Porg feathers as we travel back through the past 40 years and reassess each entrant of the series. Continue reading

The Irishman review “Scorsese treads no new ground”

The Irishman poster

Scorsese is back! But wait, it gets better… Following a 13-year hiatus from the gangster genre, he returns to the fold with a 3.5 hour-long epic starring all your favourite wise guys from the 80s and 90s. The Irishman, also titled I Heard You Paint Houses in the opening credits (there must have been some sort of mix-up in the marketing department), sees Robert De Niro return to Scorsese’s roll call as real-life gangster Frank Sheeran, a lorry driver turned crook made infamous by his association with the Bufalino crime family.

I must admit, after seeing the cast, the trailer and the reviews that followed, I was very excited as I sat down to watch The Irishman. Not only do we get a Scorsese gangster film, but we get a Scorsese gangster film with Harvey Keitel, we get Joe Pesci back from retirement and, to top it all off, we get De Niro and Pacino, two of Hollywood’s greatest actors, sharing screen time for only the third time in cinema history. Continue reading

The Aeronauts review “More melodrama than meteorology”

The Aeronauts posterNothing sets the tone better for a movie than a bit of historical revisionism. The Aeronauts, starring Eddie Redmayne, follows the real-life exploits of James Glaisher as he embarks on a perilous adventure in the name of scientific advancement. Where the film departs from reality is in Glaisher’s co-pilot, actual companion Henry Coxwell is replaced by fictional hot air balloon pilot, Amelia Wren (played by Felicity Jones).

Armed with this knowledge before entering the cinema, I went in fully aware that I was in for more melodrama than meteorology. Continue reading