One Cut of the Dead review “Not just another zombie movie”

One Cut of the Dead movie posterThe horror genre is, arguably, one of the most predictable movie genres around. Stuffed to the brim with tropes, stereotypes and predictability, it can feel like you’re watching the same film over and over again. However, Japanese filmmaker Shin’ichirô Ueda had a different idea for his zombie flick, One Cut of the Dead. However, does it break new ground, or is it a resurrection of a movie that has already been made?

One Cut of the Dead is a story in three acts. It begins with a group of people who are filming a low-budget zombie horror movie in a disused water filtration plant, but then are attacked by real zombies. Carnage ensues for about half an hour, before the movie takes a completely surprising turn. Without giving too much away, it’ll have you crying, but not in a scared way. Continue reading

Roma review “One of the best films on Netflix”

Roma movie posterWith Oscars season in full swing, it’s common knowledge that quite a lot of really good movies are currently being released. One of these really good movies that have been released, is a Netflix special. Roma directed by Alfonso Cuaron has quickly risen to the top of everyone’s list of films to watch, and it also won three Oscars at this year’s Academy Awards. However, is it deserving of any of them?

Roma follows a family and their maid in 1970s Mexico, showing the hardships faced by this little group of people as well as the country they live in. It’s all in black and white and varies between Spanish and Mixtec, giving the audience a true, authentic feel of the life that these characters are living. It’s also based upon the life of Cuaron’s nanny when he was a child, which elevates the story so much more. Continue reading

High Flying Bird review “So much more than just another sports movie”

High Flying Bird posterNetflix movies have been gradually moving up the movie food chain. From the outrage that surrounded Beast of No Nation‘s Oscar snub, to recent awards darling, Roma, scooping up the majority of the awards and nominations at most shows, it’s easy to see that Netflix isn’t a foe to be ignored. Their latest release, High Flying Bird, directed by Steven Soderbergh of Erin Brockovich fame, and written by Tarell Alvin McCraney (Moonlight), it isn’t hard to expect quite a lot from this movie.

It follows Ray, a sports agent, as he navigates an NBA lockout with his rookie client, Erick. With a star-studded cast and a team that is, arguably, overqualified to orchestrate such a simple plot, Netflix looks as though they’re onto a winner. Continue reading

Polar review “Oh dear”

Polar movie posterThe humble graphic novel has paved the way for many of the iconic movies we know and love today: Watchmen, Scott Pilgrim vs The World and 300 to name but a few.  Netflix’s latest release is a foray into that elusive world of the graphic novel, bringing gory hitman tale Polar to our TV screens. However, did it translate on screen as it did on paper?

Polar follows world-renowned assassin Duncan (Mads Mikkelsen) as he prepares for his retirement at the age of 50. Against his will, Duncan is forced back into his killing ways when he is pursued by a group of people who want him dead. Continue reading

Summer of 84 review “Blood, gore and nostalgia”

Summer of 84 movie posterThe 1980’s has become a ‘flavour of the month’ for many a medium in the 21st century. Maybe it’s because the filmmakers of today were the children of the 1980s, or maybe it’s just because the 1980’s is one of the most idealised periods of time. Children riding on bikes, nothing to be scared of. However, Summer of 84 would disagree that there’s nothing for kids to be scared of, even in the 80s.

Summer of 84 follows a group of kids as they try to prove that their next door neighbour, Mr Mackey, is a notorious serial killer. As with all good homages to the 80s, it’s got good music, bad fashion and a lot of walkie talkies. Continue reading