Emma. review “A case of style over substance”

Emma. movie posterJane Austen is responsible for many of the world’s most beloved romance novels. From Pride and Prejudice, to Sense and Sensibility, she has paved the way for the modern rom-com. Her tales have graced both the big and little screen in the form of period dramas, and 90s LA girl fantasies.

However, Emma (arguably Austen’s funniest work) isn’t necessarily the first novel you think of when you think about the iconic author. Its most recent adaptation, directed by Autumn de Wilde, is a full-on, aesthetic overload, with frills left, right, and centre. But, is it any good? Continue reading

Queen & Slim Review “Modern day Bonnie & Clyde”

Queen & Slim posterIt has been hard to avoid the recent uproar that has plagued America. Police brutality towards people of colour has only grown in recent years, with the popularity of social media sites, like Twitter, only increasing the number of people outraged by it. The recent release of the black written and directed Queen & Slim, showed just how prevalent it is within marginalised communities in the United States.

The movie follows a couple, as a Tinder date turns into an altercation with a racist police officer and the shooting of that same policeman. Suddenly, the couple are on the run, swerving the law with the help of their own community. Continue reading

Little Women review “Lightning in a bottle”

Little Women posterLittle Women is one of those stories that doesn’t age. It’s heartfelt, heartwrenching, and outright gorgeous. Even when the first feature length version was released back in 1994, it brought to life the sense of sisterhood that burns so brightly in the book. However, when Greta Gerwig announced her rendition of the beloved novel, complete with all-star cast, amazing composer and an Oscar-nominated director (herself), it’s not hard to see why people could barely contain their excitement.

If you haven’t read the book, please do. But if you don’t have time before you read this review, hereby commences the whistlestop tour of Little Women. It focuses around four sisters: Meg, the eldest; Jo, the most ‘boyish’; Beth, the most perfect; and Amy, the youngest and most divisive. It tracks their journey from youth to adulthood, along with their romances, heartbreaks, and tragedies. It’s one of those books that lingers like ink on your finger, like the smell of smoke after you blow out a candle. It sticks. Continue reading

Jojo Rabbit review ‘Monty Python, but in Nazi Germany’

JoJo Rabbit posterAh, the beauty of childhood. Running around with your best friends, making your own fun. It’s highly likely, however, that your childhood didn’t involve being a part of the Hitler Youth. Well, in the newest movie from triple-threat, Taika Waititi, it features just that. As well as, you know, the Gestapo, public hangings, and actual Hitler himself.

It doesn’t go amiss to question why such a successful comedy filmmaker would tackle such a risky subject. What also doesn’t go amiss, however, is how the story of Jojo Rabbit is handled. The movie follows Jojo, a 10 year old lad born in Germany in WWII.

His dedication to the war effort is apparent from the off – he marches around in his Hitler Youth uniform, knife readied in his belt, with his imaginary friend (who just happens to be Waititi as Hitler) issues rallying cries of support for his tiny friend. His mother (Scarlett Johansson) is quick-witted, unapologetic, and fiendishly brave. It seems as though its them and Hitler against the world, until Jojo makes a discovery in his very own house. Continue reading

Klaus review “Christmas came early”

Klaus movie posterAh, Christmas. A time of joy, of family, of eating way too much food. Christmas movies are one of life’s simple pleasures, and even though you only get to watch them once a year, there’s a definite space in everyone’s heart for their favourite one. Netflix has well and truly jumped on the Christmas bandwagon, releasing their first movie in mid November. Named Klaus, it’s a testament to the origin of that infamous character we all know and love: Santa Claus.

Although it does ignore the religious aspects of Christmas, Klaus takes a darker turn. When a spoiled, rich postman arrives on the tiny island of Smeerensburg after a challenge set by his father, the luxuries he has become accustomed to are no longer within his reach. The island is split in two – two warring families rule the land, and it’s people are equally as hostile and violent. However, when he ventures north of the main town, he finds a cabin full of toys, and a strange man with a long white beard. Continue reading