Mother! review “A new fear”

Mother! posterThey say fear is the most powerful emotion. Whether it be political fear mongering or that high school English instructor, fear can be a great motivator to preserve one’s self. Fear is powerful but painstakingly difficult to sustain without a deep dedication. Perhaps this is why many horror movies today struggle to elicit a fear that lingers after the credits have rolled.

Enter 2017s horror-drama Mother! With works like Requiem for a Dream, The Wrestler and Black Swan under his belt, Director Darren Aronofsky tackles fear in Mother! Received with mix reactions, Mother! unarguably did something… different. Continue reading

You Were Never Really Here review “Unforgivingly artful”

You Were Never Really Here posterArt house cinema. The mere mention of this genre will spark endless discussions from its profound role in film to its disassociation in the collective consciousness of movie goers. But what is art house? For me what makes a movie “art house” is its unwavering devotion to its particular vision. This is why many art house films of today strive in the indie scene, as they are not bound by huge studio return on investments.

Enter indie director Lynne Ramsay’s retelling of the novella of the same name, You Were Never Really Here. In classic art house fashion, the reception to You Were Never Really Here has divided many viewers. My goal here is to contextualize the movie in hopes of getting someone off that perpetual fence. Continue reading

I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House review “A well written Ghost”

I Am The Pretty Thing That Lives in the House posterWhether you call them apparitions, ectoplasms, or guilt-ridden hallucinations, ghosts have made their presence known in and out of fiction. Ghosts have a creative edge by being universal and interpreted in many forms. They can be vengeful sprits or helpful guides to the living. Netflix’s newest ghost story, I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House, is a more traditional take on the ghost. They are opaque, haunting and a real hassle for the living. With such an established trope (and before I make a bad ghost pun), let’s take a look at what I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House brings to the table.

I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House is about a hospice nurse named Lily (Ruth Wilson) who is hired to look over the elderly Iris (Paula Prentiss) in her haunted estate. The movie opens with narration from Lily retelling her deadly experience in the house and from there the her words come to fruition. Continue reading

Cam review “An Empty Conversation”

Cam movie posterAdvancements in technologies in film are more often than not depicted as evil and wicked to the human race. Shows like Westworld and Black Mirror reinforce this idea that humans struggle to adapt to new shiny toys. Technology is ever evolving and because we have a difficult time keeping up in the real world literature and film have a field day with this unknown. This is where Netflix’s Cam comes into play. In the era of live streaming one’s personal life online, Cam tackles issues of internet safety and identity on and off the internet, but how well?

The movie follows an up and coming cam girl, Alice (Madeline Brewer), as she performs in front of webcams for a prestigious number one spot. She partakes in everything from erotic showcasing to “self-harm”, almost anything to get her rank up in the leaderboards. Just as her popularity spikes a mysterious doppelgänger steals her account and online identity. Continue reading

The Shining: Horror Movies Explored

The Shining movie posterEliciting horror in film is, in my opinion, one of the most difficult tasks a director can take on. Meticulous planning in camera, lighting and pacing and so much more go into leaving an impression on the audience. As a huge fan of horror, I recently gave The Shining a watch, one of the undisputed champions of the horror genre.

Although it lived up to its reputation as being scary as hell, I was left scratching my head by the end of it. I couldn’t pinpoint why I found it so scary. There weren’t any jump scares or tense music cues to reveal an ugly monster or any other conventional horror means of scariness. Continue reading