MM Top 5: Video game movies

10410305_559956154112893_7235515021564324601_nBy Rob Stoakes.

For the nerds among you, it won’t be a surprise to learn that the video game industry has always had an inferiority complex and has been striving to become like the film industry for years, despite being far more successful. And now, with out-of-control production budgets, a mainstream industry constantly ripping their own customers off and the indie scene becoming dominated by crowd-funding and a lack of quality control, the video game industry has 100% succeeded.

However, now it seems that films want to be like video games. And why not; in comparison to video games, films just suck. There’s no film dealing with the emotional struggle of being an overweight Italian plumber who indulges in magic mushrooms and smashes bricks with his head to get coins, and the world is poorer for it. So cinema is attempting to get its game on, not that anyone appreciates it; Pixels has been very poorly received and early reviews of Hitman: Agent 47 don’t paint a better picture. So the question needs to ask; has Hollywood ever gotten our video games actually right? Continue reading

“Clinical and incomprehensible” Hitman: Agent 47 review

HITMAN: AGENT 47 (UK CERT: 15)

Director: Aleksander Bach  

Music: Marco Beltrami

Starring: Rupert Friend, Hannah Ware


REVIEW AUTHOR: Adam Brannon

Copyright: 20th Century Fox

Copyright: 20th Century Fox

The transition from video game to movie is notoriously difficult to get right. From box-office disasters like Super Mario Bros. to the poorly received Resident Evil franchise, it appears no film is spared from either financial woe or critically panning.

Hitman has become one of the most popular game series’ ever but the 2007 film of the same name failed to kick-start the franchise’s transition to the silver screen. Now, eight years later, Rupert Friend stars as the red tie-wearing assassin in Hitman: Agent 47, but does it succeed as a reboot? Continue reading

“Family holidays will never be the same” Vacation review

VACATION  (UK CERT: 15)

Director: Jonathan Goldstein, John Francis Daley  

Music: Mark Mothersbaugh

Starring: Ed Helms, Christina Applegate, Chris Hemsworth


REVIEW AUTHOR: Adam Brannon

MV5BMTUwNTM0ODMxM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjM4Nzk4NTE@._V1__SX1303_SY615_It was 1983 when Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo made the infamous decision to take their family across the US to “America’s Favourite Family Fun Park” in National Lampoon’s Vacation.

Being the best in the long-running series, it seemed natural for it to receive a fully-fledged sequel of some kind, but it has taken up until now to get the balance right, but does Vacation evoke memories of that brilliant road-trip comedy? Continue reading

“5+5=7” Absolutely Anything review

ABSOLUTELY ANYTHING  (UK CERT: 12A)

Director: Terry Jones  

Music: George Fenton

Starring: Simon Pegg, Robin Williams, Eric Idle


REVIEW AUTHOR: Rob Stoakes

Copyright: Lionsgate UK

Copyright: Lionsgate UK

Let’s say Gordon Ramsey went fishing, and got a huge salmon. With that salmon, he cooks a fish pie, but he wants it to be really good. He tirelessly works on it, getting the perfect pastry and the perfect vegatables to go with this perfect salmon. After slaving away, he serves it to you, and it looks delicious. You take a sniff, indulging in the beautiful smell, and take a bite. However, when your lips meet the food you find that this fish pie, through acts of freakish chance, tastes identical to a Cornish pasty from Greggs. Continue reading

“Where’s the off switch?” Pixels review

PIXELS   (UK CERT: 12A)

Director: Chris Columbus  

Music: Henry Jackman

Starring: Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Josh Gad


REVIEW AUTHOR: Adam Brannon

Copyright: 2014 CTMG, Inc and Sony Pictures Entertainment

Copyright: 2014 CTMG, Inc and Sony Pictures Entertainment

When was the last time you went to the cinema to see something original? It’s probably a question a lot of film fans ask themselves and in the last few years, perhaps proved rather difficult to answer.

However, with 2015 being the year of the reboot and the sequel, it’s nice to see a film like Pixels showcasing something completely different. But is it worth a go? Continue reading